Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

Summer can be stifling, but with the appropriate attire, you can survive. The first fabric that springs to mind for keeping you cool may be cotton, but there are other fabrics that work just as well. Here are some of the most recommended summer fabrics for your next shopping trip.

Lawn Cloth Is the Ideal Summer Fabric

Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

Lightweight and semi-transparent, with a soft, semi-crisp, or crisp finish, lawn cloth is a fabric manufactured from cotton and linen. Fabrics with a high thread count create a silky sheen and a semi-transparent appearance. Dresses, blouses, handkerchiefs, nightgowns, and shirts are just few of the many garments that benefit from being made from lawn cloth.

Rayon Is Inexpensive And Lightweight

Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

Rayon is a more cost-effective substitute for silk since it is constructed from a mix of natural and synthetic fibers in addition to cotton and wood pulp. This breathable, non-sticky fabric is best washed by hand because it doesn’t hold up as well as linen.

Textiles Made From Flax

Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

Fabrics made from flax have been in use for centuries and are popular today. Linen, a popular fabric, is woven from flax fibers and provides a breathable, lightweight alternative to other textile options. Linen is more expensive than cotton, but it lasts longer and keeps you warmer because of its insulating characteristics.

Chambray, A Supple And Adaptable Fabric

Top Fabrics for Hot Summer Days

During the warmer months, you should switch to something airier than your heavy denims. While chambray has the look and feel of denim, it is as soft and comfortable as cotton. This adaptable material is perfect for summertime formalwear like tailored pants and button-downs.

Is there anything that comes close to matching cotton’s light and cozy texture? Cotton’s reputation as the best summer material stems from the fact that air can easily pass between its fibers. Cotton doesn’t absorb moisture and dries rapidly, so you may wear it even when you sweat (see also: Tips to Extend the Life of Your Cotton Clothes). Cotton comes in a wide variety of textures and weaves, from muslin and terry cloth to flannel and sateen to gauze and sailcloth and velveteen. However, are there any respectable substitutes?